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amoxicillin / clavulanic acid
Amoxicillin/ticarcillin

Clavulanic acid

b-lactamases are responsible for the resistance of many bacteria to b-lactam antibiotics. Many b-lactamase inhibitors have been investigated, and the three which are most suitable for clinical use are clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and tazobactam.

Clavulanic acid is a naturally occurring b-lactamase inhibitor which was isolated from Streptomyces clavuligerus [1]. It contains a b-lactam ring but, unlike the penicillins and cephalosporins, it shows only a low level of antibacterial activity.

Therapeutic use

Dosage and Administration

Toxicology

Pharmacokinetic

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Absorption

The drug is not orally available.

Distribution

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Mechanism of Action

Antibacterial activity

 

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Medicinal Chemistry

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1. Reading C., Cole M. "Clavulanic acid: a beta-lactamase-inhibiting betalactam from Streptomyces clavuligerus". Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 11: 852, (1977).

 

 

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